Transitional Healing

Facilitating Life’s Transitions

Archive for the ‘Scar Tissue’ Category

Scar Tissue and Cesarean Birth ( C-Section )

Posted by Angela on March 30, 2007

Over my years of private practice I have treated countless women who experience low back pain.  Their pain has all been similar by a description of pain in the buttocks, sacrum and along the crest of the hips in the back.  A good portion of these women have had children delivered via cesarean (c-section), with resulting prominent scar tissue just above the pubic bone.  Through palpation I have found their lower abdominal region armoured, with very little fascial and tissue glide. 

Through further assessment I found that by stretching or pulling the scar tissue it will typically refer pain into either one or both hip flexors.  The hip flexors or psoas musscles originate at the lumbar vertabrae T12-L5 (your lower back).  The insertion point (or other end) of this muscle is at the lessor trochanter of the femur or in your groin.  When one hip flexor is hypertonic it will typically cause the lower lumbar spine to laterally flex.   As a result pain is manifested, typically either sciatic pain or lower back pain. 

Another symptom I have seen with these clients who have had c-sections is that they may have issues with lower digestion such as irritable bowel syndrome or elimination difficulties.  Again, the tightening created by the scar tissue pulls within the abdominal cavity and thus affects the organs.

Bottom line, typically the scar tissue that formed after the c-section has tightened and pulled their bodies our of balance and the symptoms of pain in the back really originates  in the abdomen.  Fortunately there is a solution that works for most women.  Myofascial and craniosacral help unwind or release the pulling from the scar tissue in the pelvic floor.  The hip flexor(s) can then return to balance or homeostasis.  This relaxation of the tight lower abdominal tissue relieves pressure off of the low back, increases leg movement, and typically relieves pain. 

— Michael

 

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Posted in Bodywork Modalities, Chronic Pain, Craniosacral, Healing, Health, Scar Tissue | 236 Comments »

Craniosacral Therapy for reducing Scar Tissue Pain

Posted by Michael on March 13, 2007

The body has the ability to heal itself after surgery.  The body produces connective tissue, adhesions and collagen, to replace the damaged compromised tissue from the result of an incision to the skin. This natural phenomenon causes the formation of scar tissue.  Scar tissue replaces damaged cells at the site of the incision or injury.  Skin scar tissue is different than deep fascial scar tissue.  Skin scar tissue lacks in pigmentation and hair follicles.  Deep scar tissue in the fascial layers of the body develops adhesions or spider like web threads to help the body heal and recover.

There can be a potential problem in the development of scar tissue. The problem lies when scar tissue and adhesions go unchecked over the years.  The scar tissue and adhesions start attaching themselves to bones, arteries, veins, nerves, and organs.  This phenomenon alone can cause dysfunction in the homeostasis of the body and possibly manifest into further complications in our body’s internal health as we age.  In addition I have witnessed in my practice patient’s scar tissue developing over periods of time causing spinal curvature (scoliosis), rotated hips manifesting in sciatic pain and lower extremity discomfort, shoulder displacement causing rotator cuff problems, and cervical or neck problems manifesting in a variety of neck and headache pain.  Scar tissue can and will cause loss of range of motion making simple job and home activities difficult to perform.   In addition there have been preliminary studies showing that manual therapies such as Craniosacral therapy can relive the discomforts and problematic symptoms in the Ureogential region after “C” section deliveries.  One of the most profound areas of relief from scar tissue is a patient who has had open-heart surgery.  I myself have recovered from open-heart surgery.  I receive scar and adhesion therapy once a month for the last 10 years.  My primary care doctor concurs that the manual therapy I receive keeps my body anatomically correct, allows my body full range of motion without pain and discomfort in the soft tissue.

Over many years in my practice I have found that Craniosacral therapy has had a profound positive effect on relieving the discomfort of scar tissue formed in the body. In addition Craniosacral therapy has afforded my patients/clients increased range of motion, the reduction of adhesions and pain in the sub acute stage after a surgical procedure.

Posted in Chronic Pain, Craniosacral, Healing, Health, Scar Tissue | 83 Comments »